4 Ways to Keep the Magic Alive After the Sales Call

On Steve's Mind: a Newsletter

“During our meeting the customer was really excited about working with me.  I was certain I’d be able to close this sale. But then I was never able to get him to answer my phone calls or emails after that.”

I’ve heard different versions of this story from many sales people. While with a customer, they create excitement and interest. But after the meeting, the customer’s interest wanes.

What’s going on?  And what can we do about it?

Ditch the PitchA good sales person is able to create a conversation that is engaging and interesting to a customer. The sales person’s presence and conversation skills are a key driver of this engagement and interest. But if they are the only drivers, it’s not hard to understand why the customer won’t be as interested tomorrow. You need to make sure your customer really understands and believes in the substance of what you are discussing.

Here are four tips to ensure that the customer has lasting beliefs about the “meat” of what you are talking about:

  1. Consider this question: “Tomorrow, if this customer is telling a friend about his meeting with me, what do I want him to say?” Answering this question will force you to think of key takeaways that you want to leave with your customer. And, it will force you to focus your message.
  2. Use language your customer would use. It’s always important to avoid jargon, and it’s especially important during a sales call. Your customer can only create clear, lasting beliefs about his conversation with you if he can frame those beliefs with words that are natural and familiar to him. Pay attention to the way he talks, and be sure to offer your information in language that matches the language he uses.
  3. Give your customer opportunities to summarize. Give your customer room to recap his thoughts. Don’t be afraid to ask your customer to summarize what he’s taking away from the conversation.  This will give you a chance to see if he’s understanding the things you want him to understand, and it will also help him solidify his thoughts.
  4. Give your customer a recap — now and in your follow-up note. If your customer isn’t able or willing to summarize his takeaway, give your own summary to the customer as the conversation is winding down. And, if appropriate, recap those points in a follow-up note.

Your customer leads a busy life; he doesn’t spend a lot of time thinking about your product, and he doesn’t care as much about this sale as you do. For these reasons, it’s unlikely that he’s going to remember your conversation as clearly as you will. Use these four tips to help him create motivating, lasting beliefs that will encourage him to buy.

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Posted in Conversation, Customer Encounters, Ditch the Pitch, Newsletters, Sales

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